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plecostumus(janitor fish) infestation in philippines

artform


Posted 8/14/2007 2:56:03 PM
hello to everyone.

ive been in the net looking for people that can help us control the population of plecostumus here in our lakes in the philippines. and im hoping there are people here can give us an idea what to do about it.

it was introduced in our lakes by fish enthusiasts that probably got fed up with the plec and threw it in the lake.
right now if you throw a fishing net in one of our affected lakes, you can get a boatful(dinghy size) in about 5minutes.

the solution being done right now is to capture as much fish as they can and bury it alive.
there are also steps being done to see whether the plecostumus has any other use, e.g. biodiesel, cosmetics, etc. but if there are no concrete examples or someone/something to base it on i think this will not move.

my question is has someone done this before? if you can give me the contact number of the person or his website that would be great.

ty in advance and hope for your replies
bgood


Posted 8/16/2007 6:00:31 AM
Here is a picture of Janitor fish from a lake in the Philippines


This is particularly interesting to me because, though I live in Canada now, I spent a summer working in Los banos in the Philippines. I've looked around a little and it appears there are already some potential solutions underway. See this article for some references.

Basically, seems like the best thing to do is to find some predators for it. Since its edible (they eat it grilled and in soup in South America apparently) people may be be the best choice.

artform


Posted 8/16/2007 12:53:34 PM
bgood,

thanks thats great information...but what concerns me is the date of the article,june 5 2006. as of right now there are still no concrete solution in the part of LLDA or DENR. i saw a follow up article on the marikina river around 3 months ago and the status still the same. your idea of eating the fish is already being done in some provinces here, but its not a popular dish because of how it looks.

i guess the govt still doesnt see the gravity of the situation because the best idea came not from a philippine scientist but from a high school student in marikina!!

if we can find a use for the plecostumus, specially if one can turn it into a tiny profit, i believe people will grab all the fish they could get and finally get rid of the plecs in our lakes once and for all...comments?



trook


Posted 8/16/2007 1:03:37 PM
A paper that may be of some help...


Invasive alien species (IAS): Concerns and status in the Philippines
By: Ravindra C. Joshi
Philippine Rice Research Institute (PhilRice) Maligaya,
Science City of Muoz, Nueva Ecija 3119, Philippines
E-mail: rcjoshi@philrice.gov.ph; joshiraviph@yahoo.com


Here is a pertinent paraphrase from the paper..

"More recently, the South American sucker mouth catfish or janitor fish, earlier identified as Plecoptomus hypoglosus and later verified to be Pterygoplichthys pardalis and P. disjunctivus have become invasive in the Marikina River (Metro Manila), Lake
Paitan in Cuyapo, Nueva Ecija and Laguna de Bay (Agasen, 2005). Introduced by the aquarium trade industry, the species escaped into natural waters. Damage to the banks of the Marikina River and fish cages in Laguna de Bay by the nuisance catfish is claimed. A bounty system for the eradication of the janitor fish has been launched by the City Government of Marikina. The live fish is brought at the price of P5 per kilogram and then destroyed. A World Bank-funded project for the conversion of the species into fishmeal is being implemented by the Laguna Lake Development Authority in cooperation with a farmers cooperative in Laguna."

trook


Posted 8/16/2007 1:08:06 PM

You may also want to look into this organization


Invasive Alien Species


The purpose of this web site is to assist ASEAN countries in understanding aquatic invasive alien species (aquatic IAS) so that the benefits from appropriate use of alien species in fisheries and aquaculture can be maximized and the risks that they pose can be managed. A recent meeting1 of countries in the Mekong/Lanchang Basin called for increased capacity "to undertake preliminary environmental impact assessment and import risk analysis". The meeting further concluded that there was a need "to organize the various types of information on impacts of alien species into a central repository or clearing house for the region."

This web site provides users with information and experiences on aquatic IAS in order to address the above requests. It is intended as a tool to raise awareness of the issues and to assist users in making science-based decisions concerning the risks associated with movements of aquatic animals that may have the potential to become IAS. The web site is organized around the general principles of "risk analysis."

trook


Posted 8/16/2007 1:22:13 PM

From the same website, here is a link to list of International Regulatory Documents dealing with the introduction and/or transfer of aquatic organisms.

Hopefully something within these regulatory documents can help you find a solution.

artform


Posted 8/17/2007 12:22:07 PM
thanks trook!!
Lyn


Posted 1/15/2009 6:27:51 PM

artform said:
hello to everyone. ive been in the net looking for people that can help us control the population of plecostumus here in our lakes in the philippines. and im hoping there are people here can give us an idea what to do about it. it was introduced in our lakes by fish enthusiasts that probably got fed up with the plec and threw it in the lake. right now if you throw a fishing net in one of our affected lakes, you can get a boatful(dinghy size) in about 5minutes. the solution being done right now is to capture as much fish as they can and bury it alive. there are also steps being done to see whether the plecostumus has any other use, e.g. biodiesel, cosmetics, etc. but if there are no concrete examples or someone/something to base it on i think this will not move. my question is has someone done this before? if you can give me the contact number of the person or his website that would be great. ty in advance and hope for your replies


 


Hi!


I'm an undergrad student here in the Philippines. I'm looking for a good research topic and research on janitor fish in Marikina river is one on my list. Do you have any suggestion? I could also help in controlling the population of these fishes in the Philippines.


I'll give you my email address.


glorilynjoyce_ong@yahoo.com


Thanks!

trojan


Posted 7/21/2009 7:06:49 AM

 


i just read and watch in internet (just now) about the problem of our country (Phil) in JANITOR FISH, which all the people say JANITOR FISH is a PEST.


from my point of view:  WE NEED TO STUDY FIRST BEFORE WE CONSIDERED ONE SPECIES IS A PEST IN OUR EVERY DAY LIFE.


Can't we see or try to imagine that some people use it as a pet in their aquarium and believe it or not they say ONE COMMON THING.....they clean the aquarium, VERY CLEAN.....


if we apply in general meaning or in broad mind.... ILOG PASIG OR ANY DIRTY RIVER IN THE PHILIPPINES WILL BE CLEAN IN A SHORT PERIOD OF TIME BECAUSE OF JANITOR FISH....they say,  Janitor fish eats  "EAT EVERYTHING".....


one news i read few minutes that the J.F. found (after axamination) in marikina contained toxic waste, bacteria from human waste, etc...


so what does it means? the fish can survive even in the "DEAD RIVER"


ONE THING IS FOR SURE...... this FISH help us to CLEAN the river..


only i can say is....STUDY FIRST AND SEE OTHER BENIFITS ....plus....this fish is full of bacteria at this time so it's not EDIBLE....and it should put on FIRE after catch not to BURIED because it's contaminated with toxic waste...any toxic waste we buried, it will go UP again because the trees and anything that grows will SIP the TOXIC waste,  it will go on the trunks, to leaves and next to the AIR....


 


just my opinion...


 


 


 


 

artform


Posted 7/22/2009 7:58:18 AM

hi Lyn,


Post your research so someone here  can prove or disprove your articles and probably point you in the right direction.  This will make your research much faster.

artform


Posted 7/22/2009 8:16:15 AM

Trojan,


You are right if you buy a plecostumus for your aquarium then of course you will not consider it a pest. A pest simply means something that destroys rather than co-exist.   The plecostumus was artificially introduced therefore the ecosystem in Marikina river was disrupted. Plecostumus cleans the aquarium, thats true, but if you notice they only clean organic things like leftover foods, algae, etc...but it doesnt eat plastic, trash, wrappings.  To say that we can solve the Pasig river problem by putting Plecostumus in is at best wishful thinking.


 

Barraca


Posted 8/6/2010 9:16:10 AM
Alarming shortage of supply of seaweeds (carragenophytes) is now a big problem of the seaweed industry of the Philippines. This problem was brought about by several factors such as nutrient depeletion, global warming, pollution, grazers, competition of species, and poachers. In other words, open-sea farming of seaweeds is no longer profitable hence, declining in the Philippines due to the above problems. As a Marine Agronomist, the best solution inorder to be number one carrageenan producer in the world is to go into land-based system of farming the seaweed. In this way, the above problems can be controlled.These farms can be developed along shore-lines (still plenty of areas available).
Barraca


Posted 8/6/2010 9:24:01 AM
Today I bought 4 pieces of janitor fish to be grown together with my tilapias and gold fishes. The aquarium store sold them at P60.00 a piece.I hope this janitor fish will perform their function of cleaning our fish pond by eating the uneaten feeds and algae. I have seen the big size of this fish in a fish pond and they were quite interesting.I will try to conduct my observation and report them later.

 
ArmoredFish


Posted 10/7/2010 9:50:20 PM
 Hey everyone. I'm a 4th year B.S. Biology student from the University of the East Manila and im currently doing a thesis on the possible antimicrobial activity of the epidermal mucus extract of the armored catfish. I do personally think they're kind of a nuisance to our lakes here in the philippines, but if we can confirm our study, then they might have a use after all. I don't think anybody here in the Phil. has ever done this so this might be a real challenge to us. i would like to know if anybody here knows something about the histology of this fish species; the identification of the mucous cells would be of great help to this study. :)
archetype


Posted 11/6/2010 12:17:48 PM
Don't kill yet, I really mean DON'T KILL the Janitor Fish. I hope your government will create a big fish pond and transfer all those janitor fish in that fish pond. The fish pond should be unbreakable by janitor fish. There are  lots of ways to use the janitor fish not only for bio-oil.
Barraca


Posted 11/8/2010 3:32:10 AM
You are right! Don't be drastic. Scientists always believe that there is a solution to every problem. You may not solve it in your lifetime but you can always pass the batton to the next colleague.

I have now in my collection 5 janitor fishes. I admire these fish- not very hard to care for. When my tilapias died due to oxygen depletion, they still survive. They are shy though. They always want to hide and keep still while other fish frolic around. If only humans are like them then there will be peace in this world.
rosean


Posted 6/17/2011 2:37:22 AM
Hi!

I'm interested in researching something about the janitor fish. It may possibly has an economic benefit. I would be very grateful if you could impart your knowledge and expertise on the said species.

Thanks and Regards,

Rose
VhonNaruto18


Posted 11/26/2014 7:28:58 AM

I'm will just ask if it's possible to cast out a big net to be thrown into the lake then the nets are being hold by a helicopter, the lower part of the net will be heavy so it will sink in the water but it has a rope so it can be pulled after the filtering of the lake. I think this can help to lessen the non-biodegradable objects. Then i recommend to FIlipino's to be more aware to help us preserve by advertising through the use of signages such as no littering. The other thing i thought about is a robot XD


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