CELL and DEVELOPMENTAL BIOLOGY OF XENOPUS

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Fraser Moss
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CELL and DEVELOPMENTAL BIOLOGY OF XENOPUS

CELL & DEVELOPMENTAL BIOLOGY OF XENOPUS
April 1 - 11, 2006
Application Deadline: January 15, 2006
Instructors:
Janet Heasman & Christopher Wylie,
Cincinnati Children's Hospital Research Foundation

http://meetings.cshl.edu//courses/c-xeno06.shtml

Xenopus is the leading vertebrate model for the study of gene function in development. The combination of lineage analysis, gene-knockout strategies, experimental manipulation of the embryo, and genomic/bioinformatic techniques, makes it ideal for studies on the molecular control of embryo patterning, morphogenesis and organogenesis. The course combines intensive laboratory training with daily lectures from recognized experts in the field. Students will learn both emerging technologies and classical techniques to study gene function in Xenopus development. An important element will be the informal interaction between students and course faculty.

Technologies to be covered will include: oocyte and embryo culture, lineage analysis and experimental manipulation of embryos, gain and loss of function analysis using mRNAs and antisense oligos, whole mount in situ hybridization, immunocytochemistry, RT-PCR, and genomic/bioinformatic techniques, preparation of transgenic embryos, and use of Xenopus tropicalis for genetic analyses. The Cell and Developmental Biology of Xenopus course is designed for those new to the Xenopus field, as well as for those wanting a refresher course in the emerging technologies. The course is open to investigators from all countries.

Additional lecturers in the 2006 course will include: Stefano Piccolo, Ray Keller, Tim Grammer, Carole LaBonne, Tim Mohun, Aaron Zorn and Matt Kofron.

This course is supported with funds provided by the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, the National Science Foundation and the Howard Hughes Medical Institute

Cost (including board and lodging): $2,505