SNP genotyping and human diversity

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roudi
roudi's picture
SNP genotyping and human diversity

Research on genetic variation is aimed at improving the diagnosis and treatment of numerous diseases of humans that may have significant genetic components such as Type 1 diabetes, schizophrenia, and some types of cancer by identifying specific genetic markers, or genotypes, that are associated with particular diseases or responses to drug therapies. Studies examining genetic variation in animals such as mice and rats can identify genetic regions that, in humans, may contribute to complex diseases such as diabetes and hypertension.

I am interested to detect human diversities and the basis of inherited diseases. a new approach called admixture mapping, seems ideal for studying normal human variety. The principle is to study the genomic map of the descendents
who have inherited a given genomic region from one parent but not the other.

Is anyone out there studying ancestral genetic markers for African and European genomes?

labrat
labrat's picture
You may want to contact

You may want to contact someone called John Armour at the University of Nottingham (UK). I am not sure exactly what he's working on now, but certainly when I worked in his lab for a few months several years ago he was looking at minisatellites and was interested in genetic diversity for the purpose of studying population migration.

Hope that helps.

Ps I've just found his website
http://www.nottingham.ac.uk/biology/contact/academics/armour/overview.phtml?P=1&R=1&S=&ID=3&from=hg&m1=&m2=

Sandy
Sandy's picture
roudi wrote:Research on

roudi wrote:

Research on genetic variation is aimed at improving the diagnosis and treatment of numerous diseases of humans that may have significant genetic components such as Type 1 diabetes, schizophrenia, and some types of cancer by identifying specific genetic markers, or genotypes, that are associated with particular diseases or responses to drug therapies. Studies examining genetic variation in animals such as mice and rats can identify genetic regions that, in humans, may contribute to complex diseases such as diabetes and hypertension.

I am interested to detect human diversities and the basis of inherited diseases. a new approach called admixture mapping, seems ideal for studying normal human variety. The principle is to study the genomic map of the descendents
who have inherited a given genomic region from one parent but not the other.

Is anyone out there studying ancestral genetic markers for African and European genomes?

What about using SNP genotyping methods to identify populations with high incidences of certain diseases such as type 2 diabetes which have a strong genetic line? With regard to different procedures used to collect DNA what are the best methods and companies that can do whole genome amplification?

DD
DD's picture
For whole genome

For whole genome amplification I quote below The GenomePlex from Sigma:

"The GenomePlex Whole Genome Amplification (WGA) family of products provides a robust and accurate method of amplifying nanogram quantities of starting material into microgram yields with minimal allele drop out.

The GenomePlex WGA product line utilizes a proprietary amplification technology based upon random fragmentation of genomic DNA and conversion of the resulting small fragments to PCR-amplifiable OmniPlex Library molecules flanked by universal priming sites. The OmniPlex library is then PCR amplified using universal oligonucleotide primers and a limited number of cycles.

WGA has been used in a variety of applications,1, 2 and is suitable for use with purified genomic DNA from a variety of sources including blood cards, whole blood, buccal swabs, soil, plant, and formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissues. GenomePlex WGA uses nanogram quantities of starting genomic DNA, which after PCR yields 5 to 10 g of WGA product. After purification, the WGA product can be analyzed in a manner similar to any genomic or chromosomal DNA sample. A number of downstream applications may be performed including TaqMan assays, CGH analysis, SNP analysis, sequencing, etc."

joseph
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Are there someone doing the

Are there someone doing the research about human evolution and migration?

ryan_m
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joseph wrote:Are there

joseph wrote:

Are there someone doing the research about human evolution and migration?

There most certainly is. The Genographic Project, which is supported by National Geographic, is conducting an ongoing survey of Y chromosome markers from men across the globe. I believe Spencer Wells is the lead researcher on this. If you are interested in the project you should get ahold of his book: The Journey of Man. I believe there was also a National Geographic TV series of the same title.