Monitor the journals that are important to you

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James Stevens
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Monitor the journals that are important to you

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Hi everyone,
Invitrogen has developed a new Life Science on-line search tool called Select. It has been designed to significantly reduce the time spent searching on-line for the latest papers and developments and is ideal for those studying and researching.
Select uses unique RSS spidering technology to constantly monitor over 200 Life Science journals and libraries, including PubMed, Nature, Biocompare.com, Bionity.COM and Cell, to name but a few!
Users can define their own search terms and subscribe to any number of journals from within the Select Library. Any matching papers and articles are compiled into a simple daily ebulletin, featuring a short abstract from each paper plus a link to the full text.
The Select service is completely free to use - no matter how many sources you subscribe to, or how many search terms you want Select to monitor.

To register for Select please click on the link below (or paste into your browser)
http://tiny.cc/ivgnselect39
It takes about 5 minutes to set up your preferences and you can change these at any time.
If you have any feedback about Select – both good and bad, I would love to hear about it. Please feel free to post your feedback here or email me directly at james@invitrogen-select.com

Fraser Moss
Fraser Moss's picture
Is this resource going to

Is this resource going to stay a free one or is this going to be something like Vector NTI 10 which was distributed free to academic labs and then once the next version (v11) was released you were forced to pay to continue to use the software and the functionality of the old version was disabled?

James Stevens
James Stevens's picture
Hi Fraser,

Hi Fraser,

Thanks for your question. Select was built to be a free service to aid research scientists and there are no plans to charge for it or in any way monetise its use. If you have any other comments or suggestions regarding the service please don't hesitate to contact me.

cheers,
James

James Stevens
James Stevens's picture
Hey everyone,

Hey everyone,

I am just wondering if anyone has had the chance to try Select, and whether you find it useful? I would really like to hear any feedback you could give!

Cheers,
James

Fraser Moss
Fraser Moss's picture
 I did try it quickly.  I

 I did try it quickly.  I found one interesting paper already as a result.

I like being able to see all the most recent papers and other articles in the dashboard format.  This allows me to easily identify what i actually want to read without sifting through a long list of potential hits in an email alert.

You need to add some additional topics e.g. "Physiology" and "Biophysics".  I see that the topics are generally technology driven, so perhaps you should have an "electrophysiology" topic.  I think this would stand alone from the existing Cell based assays topic.  Also what about a virology topic?

When I've had more chance to experiment I may have further comments

James Stevens
James Stevens's picture
Hi Fraser,

Hi Fraser,

Thanks for your suggestions. I Hope you get some more interesting papers on the dashboard. Also, why not have a look at the Science Pictures of the Day - they can be really interesting.

We have heard from another researcher the desire for a virology tab as an option. The other suggestions are also good calls as we are certainly willing to broaden our choices if scientists find it useful. After the general topics, however, users can define key-words for specific topics within others that they would be interested, which should help bring up results for a more diverse range.

Thanks again and I look forward to hearing more suggestions/ comments.

Cheers
James