frog and tadpole references and associated boxes

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jachmoody
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frog and tadpole references and associated boxes

HAVE LOOKED OVER THE SITE AND CAN'T FIND AN EXPLANATION FOR THE FROG AND TADPOLE REFERDENCES--PLEASE HELP

THANKS,

JIM ACHMOODY

David E
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The frog development

The frog development coincides with the number of postings a particular member has contributed to the board.

Fraser Moss
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Silly i know, but after 100

Silly i know, but after 100 posts or whatever it takes to be an adult frog could you then pick your species - like Xenopus Laevis[/i] or Dendrobates auratus[/i]?

jachmoody
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Sounds like a good idea to me

Sounds like a good idea to me!

Maturity before senility!

jim

Soudabeh
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frasermoss wrote:Silly i know

frasermoss wrote:

Silly i know, but after 100 posts or whatever it takes to be an adult frog could you then pick your species - like Xenopus Laevis[/i] or Dendrobates auratus[/i] ?

You are going to be a poison dart frog ( our logo) in this case it will be : Dendrobates pumilio. This frog is native to the tropical rain forests of Nicaragua, costa Rica and Panama.

jachmoody
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sounds dangerous--better than

sounds dangerous--better than boring!

jim

jachmoody
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Stilll having difficulty with

Stilll having difficulty with the entries for drawings options not showing up after visiting a sponser site.

jim

vanishing
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Poison dart frogs get their

Poison dart frogs get their poison from ants they eat. They do not produce the poison themselves. When kept in captivity, they lose their toxins.

jachmoody
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fascinating!

fascinating!

Fraser Moss
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Did you know that an

Did you know that an important member of the Dendrobatid family is Epipedobates tricolor? Epipedobates tricolor is one of the most poisonous frogs known to man, a single frog capable of knocking out a huge water buffalo. Contact with the potent secretions on the skin of the frog produces muscle paralysis and cardiorespiratory depression, eventually leading to death. In 1974, a highly toxic alkaloid called epibatidine (named after the frog) was isolated from the secretions on the skin of this Ecuadorian tree frog.

Epibatidine was shown to be over 200 times more potent than morphine in pain relief, but unfortunately was toxic to humans at therapeutic levels. Research into Epibatidine then slowed due to environmental and political reasons (the frog became endangered and frogs in captivity seemed incapable of producing the compound).

Epibatidine acts as a selective depolarising agent at neural, ganglionic and neuromuscular nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChR), causing excitation of the neuron or effector cell. Studies have shown that, although Epibatidine has a high affinity for alpha-4-beta-2 nicotinic receptors in the brain, it also shows remarkable selectivity for the alpha-beta-1-gamma-delta nicotinic receptors at neuromuscular junctions. Herein lies the problem of the wide range of potent side effects such as complete muscle paralysis and pulmonary depression that has restricted Epibatidine's use in modern medicine. However, based on the study of Epibatidine, many pharmaceutical research laboratories have constructed a number of synthetic compounds, which retain Epibatidine's potent analgesic effects, but without the side effects.

see - Bradley D. Frog venom Cocktail Yields One-Handed Painkiller. Science 1993; 261: 1117.

jachmoody
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Do all poison frogs get their

Do all poison frogs get their toxin from ants they digest or just certain ones?

jim

mjcloud
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i think they all get their

i think they all get their toxicity from the insects they consume.

roudi
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Poison dart frogs do not

Poison dart frogs do not produce toxins in captivity, therefore It has been suggested that they convert the low levels of poison-alkaloids- in the insects they eat into a skin coating and parotid glands secretion that are extremely toxic.

Fraser Moss
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this link

this link

http://www.kingsnake.com/toxinology/amphibian_neurotoxin.html

give a nice overview about everything we've been discussing in theis thread.

Saba Butt
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frasermoss wrote:this link

frasermoss wrote:

this link

http://www.kingsnake.com/toxinology/amphibian_neurotoxin.html

give a nice overview about everything we've been discussing in theis thread.

Very informative article. Thanks frasermoss.

jachmoody
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Thanks for the link info. jim

Thanks for the link info.
jim

Bettye
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frasermoss wrote:this link

frasermoss wrote:

this link

http://www.kingsnake.com/toxinology/amphibian_neurotoxin.html

give a nice overview about everything we've been discussing in theis thread.

It is a nice page! However....
quoting from the site: "As a general rule the toxins on the skin of the poison arrow frog are there as a deterrent against predation. If you were to lick one (no need to try just the back the toxin is secreted all over the frog) it is most likely that you would get the feeling of even more of an upset tummy than you would normally get from licking a live frog."

As a scientist, I was always told not to taste our experiments. I assumed that meant licking the specimens?!

marcia (not verified)
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A Frog Legend has now been

A Frog Legend has now been placed in the Cars & iPods section next to the MVP winners. We have added one more frog category: Frog Laureate. A Frog Laureate is a scientist who exemplifies our mission of scientists helping other scientists.

jachmoody
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A question--I take it when

A question--I take it when wee access the site from an automated e-mail we are automatically"signed in"? Either that or the auto feature of Yahoo does it?

jim

David E wrote:

The frog development coincides with the number of postings a particular member has contributed to the board.
Guest (not verified)
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Yes, the system recognizes

Yes, the system recognizes who you are and there is no need to log in.