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pig
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help

I am a novice in cell signaling / transduction, i want to know something about PKC. I don't know which paper was suitable for me, who give me some advice? research article is better.

Soudabeh
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pig wrote:I am a novice in

pig wrote:

I am a novice in cell signaling / transduction, i want to know something about PKC. I don't know which paper was suitable for me, who give me some advice? research article is better.

"Protein kinases are enzymes which catalyze the transfer of phosphate from adenosine-5'-triphosphate (ATP) to certain amino acid residues in certain proteins. Generally, the phosphorylation of a protein changes its functionality, from inactive to active in some cases, and from active to inactive in others. Thus, phosphorylation is a means of up-regulating or down-regulating processes controlled by specific proteins.

One subgroup of protein kinases is protein kinase C, which catalyze the phosphorylation of tyrosine residues in certain proteins. A protein which stimulates angiogenesis, e.g. of solid tumors, called Vascular Endotheelial Growth Factor (VEGF), depends in part on activation of a protein which is a receptor for VEGF. The activation is achieved by phosphorylation of the VEGF receptor, which is catalyzed by a protein kinase C. Drugs which inhibit protein kinase C can promote death of tumor cells which depend on VEGF-mediated angiogenesis (Yoshiji et al., 1999). A protein kinase C system can also act by stabilizing VEGF mRNA (Shih et al, 1999). "

Couple good articles:
1-Shih Sc, Mullen A, Abrams K, Mukhopadhay D, Claffey Kp
Role of protein kinase C isofors inphorbol ester-induced vascular endothelial growth factor expression i n human glioblastoma cells. J biol Chem91999) 274(22):15407-14

2-Yoshiji et al, Protein kinase C lies on the signaling pathway for vascular endothelial growth factor mediated tumor development and angiogenesis. Cancer Res (1999) 59:4413-4418

You can always check the latest publications regarding the category and forums of your interest by scrolling down the category page, in your case: the bottom page of the cell signaling/transduction category as well as the Kinases (RTKs) page. You might find articles you are looking for and you should look at these pages every day because they are constantly updated.

pig
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Thanks for your advice, I had

Thanks for your advice, I had taken the couple articles from websites of cancer research and JBC, respectively. As you said, these are good articles. However, as we known, the PKC family consists of at least 12 isoforms, which are divided into three groups: classical PKCs, novel PKCs and atypical PKCs. I am interested in PKCθ,belonged to group of novel PKCs. What should I do first? Thanks very much.