Biomaterials

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Bettye
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Biomaterials

One of the nanotechnology industry's goals is to create stronger, lighter-weight fibers based on ideas from nature such as spider silk. Is there anyone out there doing this kind of work?

vanishing
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I found this link on the Web:

I found this link on the Web:

http://www.voyle.net/Future%20Technology/Future%202004-0078.htm

There is a group at Hebrew University working on that topic

Bettye
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Thanks! It looks like an

Thanks! It looks like an interesting site.

Roshan
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Bettye wrote:

Bettye wrote:

One of the nanotechnology industry's goals is to create stronger, lighter-weight fibers based on ideas from nature such as spider silk. Is there anyone out there doing this kind of work?

Nexia [profile] of Canada has decided to refocus its fibre development towards biopolymer sales and specialized nano-scale fibre applications for spider silk away from traditional fibres and yarns. This decision was prompted by the emerging interest in nanofibres and by the ongoing technical challenges of producing bulk, cost competitive spider silk fibres with superior mechanical properties, especially strength. The spinning of BioSteel proteins into nanometer diameter fibres has been achieved, the company reports, and Nexia is now determining the product specifications for medical and micro-electronic applications.
Read Article (Source: Fibre2Fashion)

http://www.nanoinvestornews.com/modules.php?name=News&file=article&sid=3248

Bettye
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I think Nexia is the company

I think Nexia is the company that produces spider silk from goat's milk. I was wondering what happened to that technology. Thanks for the tip on that.

I recently gave a talk on some work I published back in Nature, 1999 on a model for modular adhesives I came up with in a team-oriented group. I was searching the net trying to find a picture that I donated to a website when I ran across a patent that this group filed based on my paper. My name is not on the patent. I'm a little peeved about that, because I'm still want to work in this area. Maybe they have a very specific design idea. Is there anything I can do about this? Can I still work on my ideas?

nobelprice2020
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ynnig wrote:Bettye wrote:One

ynnig wrote:

Bettye wrote:
One of the nanotechnology industry's goals is to create stronger, lighter-weight fibers based on ideas from nature such as spider silk. Is there anyone out there doing this kind of work?

I'm not sure, but you could try contacting Dr. Vincent Moy, eval(unescape('%64%6f%63%75%6d%65%6e%74%2e%77%72%69%74%65%28%27%3c%61%20%68%72%65%66%3d%22%6d%61%69%6c%74%6f%3a%76%6d%6f%79%40%6d%69%61%6d%69%2e%65%64%75%22%3e%76%6d%6f%79%40%6d%69%61%6d%69%2e%65%64%75%3c%2f%61%3e%27%29%3b'))

He sure is not working in this field. And getting in contact with him could be deleterious to your carreer. None of all of his postdocs in 10 years made a university scientific carreer. He even promised last year a scientist to be first author of a great book chapter of CSHLpress (Editor: Erica Golemis and Peter Adams) - and 14 months later (without any previous notics) the scientist had to realize he shouldn't be first author or even author of this invited book chapter - probably not a mistake by CSHLpress but by the Miami staff... so be careful about any promise from him.

Bettye
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Thanks for the heads up.

Thanks for the heads up. Nanotech, being a hot field can be very competitive and your description could describe a lot of scientists, unfortunately.

I was very fortunate at UCSB to work with a very inter-disciplinary/team-oriented group. I got pretty spoiled, I think, because it helped me realize the importance of working in teams... you really can get a whole lot more accomplished... if only more scientists would see that and put their arrogance behind them, it could be very productive.

nobelprice2020
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Bettye wrote:[...] I was very

Bettye wrote:

[...] I was very fortunate at UCSB to work with a very inter-disciplinary/team-oriented group. I got pretty spoiled, I think, because it helped me realize the importance of working in teams... you really can get a whole lot more accomplished... if only more scientists would see that and put their arrogance behind them, it could be very productive.

that's sure a very great and successful lab at UCSB - it is very important to choose the right lab. I think it's not just luck to find the right lab. congratulations

Bettye
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Unfortunately, I'm no longer

Unfortunately, I'm no longer in that lab. Funding ran out and my spouse moved... since then, I have been struggling and currently work in OTC pharmaceuticals... oh well.. at least I'm a gypsy scientist...

I think the moral, though, is to create that kind of atmosphere in whatever lab you eventually set up, if you can