Epifluorescence Microscopy

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Tony Rook
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Epifluorescence Microscopy

I am looking to solicit opinions on epifluorescence microscope brands and/or models? Please let me know of you personal experience and/or recommendations. Please be specific about the details (i.e. brand, model, features, etc).

omid
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trook wrote:

trook wrote:

I am looking to solicit opinions on epifluorescence microscope brands and/or models? Please let me know of you personal experience and/or recommendations. Please be specific about the details (i.e. brand, model, features, etc).

Check Nikon, they have the best microscopes for epifluorescence.

http://www.jochemnet.de/Nikon.html

microphotography
with a Nikon CoolPix 990

Light and Epifluorescence Microscopy
with a Zeiss Axioskop

We mounted a Nikon CoolPix 990 digital camera to a Zeiss Axioskop epifluorescence microscope for both light and fluorescence microscopy. The camera was attached to the c-mount phototube of the Axioskop by a metal sleeve. The metal sleeve fits over the standard Zeiss c-mount and possesses a threat at the upper end that fits the lense threat of the CoolPix. The camera is operated using a net adapter because the batteries life time is too short for routine use of the camera on the microscope. Microphotographs are usually taken at the highest camera photo quality (Fine), but pictures posted here were taken at intermediate quality.

Intracellular I...
Intracellular Imaging's picture
trook wrote: I am looking to

trook wrote:

I am looking to solicit opinions on epifluorescence microscope brands and/or models? Please let me know of you personal experience and/or recommendations. Please be specific about the details (i.e. brand, model, features, etc).

Unless you are doing very "special epi-fluor" work. The "brand" is not nearly as important as the epi-fluor filter set and objective.
Omega filters, Chroma ans Semrock all make very high quality filter sets. Make sure you get filters that will match the excitation and emission spectra of your fluorophore.  The above manufacturers all offer free set selection advice over the phone.
The brightness of a fluorescence image is directly proportional to the 4th power of the numerical aperture of the objective. So for optimum results use high N/A objectives for fluorescence. If you're doing FURA 2 work make sure the 340 transmission efficiency is good.  Your microscope rep can provide that info. In general, "Plan Fluorite" objectives are minimally acceptable. Each microscope manufacturer has a different nomenclature for their "upgraded" fluor objectives. But for the basic fluor objectives they generally use "Fluor" or "Flourite" in identification.
Some fluorophores like GFP,DAPI, Calcium Green and a few others are so bright that high N/A objectives are not really necessary. But for most epi-fluor work, you'll be glad you invested in higher N/A objectives.
Dave Will