Neuronal prosethics

8 posts / 0 new
Last post
duckydude1
duckydude1's picture
Neuronal prosethics

Well I have ana idea but I dont really know where to start I'm pretty young but I always have decent ideas and now I'm going to start tryng to build them. I have one almost complete and now im stuck with the second because i dont know whats possible and whats not. i just thought you should know that before you try and help me.

duckydude1
duckydude1's picture
Well now for my question I

Well now for my question I need to know if its possible for something to be genetically connected to your brain through you spinal cord, and if so how to do that.

Guy Sovak
Guy Sovak's picture
Could you please give some

Could you please give some details?

duckydude1
duckydude1's picture
well i want to know if it is

well i want to know if it is at all posible to attach something to your spine and attach that to your brain through nerves so you could actually use it like you use the rest of your body

duckydude1
duckydude1's picture
and if it is at all possible

and if it is at all possible is it right?

Tony Rook
Tony Rook's picture
duckydude1:

duckydude1:

What you are asking about reminds me of Dr. Octupus from Spiderman. Where he was able to control with his mind the bionics arms attached to his spine. Well once again, science fiction (in this case comic fiction), turns science fact... or at least one step in the right direction.

Here is a link to Dr. Todd A Kuiken from the Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago. He is working on grafting live nerves from amputees to allow them to control their prosthetic arms.

Here are some links regarding this technology:

Popular Science - Best of What's New 2005

JAMA Article

CBS Evening News

CNN Report

Hope this helps answer your question.

duckydude1
duckydude1's picture
well thank you for telling me

well thank you for telling me about dr. kuiken maybe i should send him a letter with some questions.....

Tony Rook
Tony Rook's picture
I would encourage you to ask

I would encourage you to ask him where would be the best place to complete your undergraduate degree in preparation for a graduate degree within this growing field of prosthetics.

Another field that is growing very quickly is neural stimulation. There are currently several implantable medical devices on the market for controlling pain, urinary incontinence, epilepsy, and retinal stimulation (to just name a few).

Here are a few more sites you can look into to better understand this field:

National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke - Neural Prosthesis Program (NPP)

What are neural prosthetics?
Neural prosthetic devices are artificial extensions to the body that restore or supplement function of the nervous system lost during disease or injury. Neural prosthetics are devices that are used to allow disabled individuals the ability to control their own bodies and lead fuller and more productive lives.

Neural Stim
Neural stimulation has been shown to be effective for reducing the symptoms of Parkinson's Disease. It is also useful for alleviating some types of chronic pain. Research is currently underway to determine its efficacy in addressing a variety of other neurological conditions. Per the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, the brain is the most intricate part of the human body. It is the center of intelligence, interpreter of the senses, initiator of body movement, and controller of behavior. Lying in its bony shell and washed by protective fluid, the brain is the source of all the qualities that define our humanity.

Neural Stimulation as a method of controlling prostatitis symptoms
Over one million people in the United States alone have problems with frequent voiding and unstable bladder disease. A recent study in Germany estimated that ten per cent of the adult female population suffered from this disorder. Bladder retraining, pelvic floor exercises, biofeedback, and anti-cholinergic drug therapy (oxybutynin,tolterodine) are effective measures to treat this problem. However, some patients remain resistant to therapy. For this group of patients, unilateral sacral nerve stimulation offers a safe and nondestructive alternative. It has rapidly replaced major and often unsuccessful surgery as the primary form of therapy in this difficult group of patients. It's usage for chronic prostatitis and interstitial cystitis is growing.

Standford School of Medicine (Opthalmology) - Retinal Prosthesis
The leading cause of blindness in developed countries is Age-related Macular Degeneration (AMD), which results in severe and irreversible loss of vision for over two million Americans. The disease causes deterioration of the photoreceptor cells in the central part of the retina, and currently, there is no cure. The retinal neurons that receive signals from the photoreceptors, however, are mostly preserved even several years after the onset of blindness. A possible therapeutic solution is to communicate with these neurons directly to restore the visual pathway.

It has been already demonstrated by several groups that electric stimulation of the retina can produce perception of light (phosphenes) in patients suffering from retinal degeneration.

Integrated BioElectronics Research Group - University of California Santa Cruz
The Integrated BioElectronics Research Group led by Prof. Wentai Liu develops miniaturized electronics for interfacing with biological systems and replace lost biological functionality if required. The group has expertise in visual prosthetic systems to replace lost vision, wireless power transmission, low power electronics which operate in close proximity to the living tissue, non-invasive bi-directional communication between implant electronics and external environment, functional electrical stimulation (FES). We study the theory behind the existing problems in above areas, develop novel and efficient solutions and implement them in the form of custom designed integrated circuits. Brief descriptions of the projects in the group are given below.

California Nanosystems Institute - Dr. Jack W Judy, PhD
Technical Research Interest: Prof. Judy and his research group work in two fields: (1) novel nano- and micro-electro-mechanical systems (NEMS/MEMS) and (2) application of state-of-the-art engineering technologies to brain research, a field now called neuroengineering. Specific NEMS/MEMS research activities include ferromagnetic NEMS/MEMS for physical actuation and sensing at many levels of scale and miniaturized chemical-sensing systems. Examples include ferromagnetic actuators for optical, RF, and biomedical applications and micromachined electrochemical nitrate sensors with integrated microfluidics. His lab is also actively investigating the scaling limits of ferromagnetic actuators through a study of nanomagnetomechanical devices. Specific neuroengineering research interests include technologies for improving brain-computer interfaces, such as multi-electrode neural microprobes for neural recording and stimulation and miniature wireless neural transceivers. The neural-probe technologies are being used for deep-brain-stimulation applications, such as Parkinson's disease research. The wireless neural transceivers are being developed for a wide range of behavioral and neurophysiological research projects. In addition, some research projects bridge his lab's two broad research fields NEMS/MEMS and neuroengineering. Examples include nanomachined single-cell patch-clamp instruments with integrated microfluidics and clog-resistant MEMS-enabled hydrocephalus shunts.