cross-correlation analysis for single-unit extracellular recordings

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ecolechio
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cross-correlation analysis for single-unit extracellular recordings

Imagine that you are recording from 2 neurons, one in each cerebral hemisphere, and you want to construct a CCG in which the left hemisphere neuron is arbitrarily designated the "Reference" neuron and the one in the right hemisphere is arbitrarily designated the "Target" neuron. It is already known that neurons in this particular part of the brain phase-lock to a stimulus. Separate stimuli are being applied to the same part on both sides of the body, but the phase of the stimulus on the right of the body lags the phase of the stimulus on the left of the body by 90o .   What are your predictions about how this (shift-corrected) CCG will look?

The FFM
The FFM's picture
This looks like you should

This looks like you should chat with Kevin Alloway at Penn State fred.psu.edu/ds/retrieve/fred/investigator/kda1

Looking at your MyBenchSpace you are already pretty close.  You might even be in the same dept.

I'm not sure if chapter 2 of this book might help you?

Time and the brain By Robert Miller

CRC; 1 edition (September 11, 2000)

  • ISBN-10: 9058230600
  • ISBN-13: 978-9058230607
ecolechio
ecolechio's picture
Well...I will chat with him,

Well...I will chat with him, as he is my advisor. ;) I just had an idea of my own prediction, and I wanted to check it against what others thought before I brought it up to him. (Trying to impress The Boss, you know!) By the way...my prediction is that once you subtract out the shift-predictor, there will be a single peak in the CCG. I think that it should be centered to reflect the time difference between their phases.

ecolechio
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a follow-up: The book

a follow-up: The book recommendation was very appropriate and helpful. I interlibrary-loaned the 2nd chapter, and it was very useful. Thanks!!

The FFM
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Always pleased to hear that

Always pleased to hear that something I posted was useful.  Thank you for the update. 

Were your predictions correct in the end?
 

ecolechio
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I am not sure whether they

I am not sure whether they are correct; I haven't done the experiments yet.  I am having trouble with the way to use correctly the shift-predictor in this situation, in which both neurons are intentionally being stimulated.